Marble

Our December All Killer No Filler box revealed

We've still got a couple of All Killer No Filler beer subscription boxes left for you to pick up before Christmas (or get it delivered in time for NYE). If you've been wavering, check out what's in this month's box to get you excited (SPOILER ALERT). What a way to end the year!

 

 

#HBBAdvent Beer 8: Marble Earl Grey IPA (Manchester)

Marble says: Brouwerij Emmelisse’s Kees Bubberman joined us originally to make this mouth watering India Pale Ale. With timed additions of Earl Grey during fermentation, heavy infused hopping and traditional cask maturing. the result is a citrus fruit aroma , smooth sleek texture, hop notes are brilliantly complemented by bergamot and a light tannic finish.

We say: The best place to drink this is at Manchester's Marble Arch pub, probably the best pub on earth. But if you can't make it to the Arch, this perfectly balanced beer is good anywhere, any place. We were privileged to work with JK and his team this year brewing our collab DIPA Murk du Soleil as part of their 20th anniversary series. Happy birthday for last week, guys. Cheers for the beers. - Glenn

HB&B Sub Club - our July and August boxes revealed

Our All Killer No Filler HB&B Sub Club boxes just keep getting better. Check out the most recent boxes below and then get yourself over to the shop to join the club...

July

 

August

The Beer Lover’s Table: Summery Cured Salmon with Marble x Holy Crab LanGOSEtine Langoustine & Pineapple Gose

I like a beer that isn’t afraid of being controversial - and Marble’s LanGOSEtine is definitely polarising. For beer drinkers unused to sour beers, goses - which are distinctly tart, as well as saline - are an acquired taste. The fact that this particular gose is brewed with pineapple and langoustines makes it all the more eyebrow-raising.

But don’t be put off by its quirks. Zesty, bright, and fresh, Langosetine is summertime drinking perfection - especially considering the langoustines add subtle, briny depth rather than fishiness. (Consider, too, that oyster stouts have been made since the 1800s, so there’s a precedent for seafood-laced brews.)

Though this is the kind of easygoing beer that could get on with all kinds of dishes, seafood is a natural pick - and cured salmon works beautifully.

Making your own cured salmon is an exceptionally gratifying thing, especially given how simple the process really is (and how impressive the end results). All you need to procure is kosher salt (I used Diamond Crystal), sugar, herbs, spices, and citrus zest, plus the best cut of salmon you can get your hands on - it’s worth paying for sashimi-grade fish, as you’ll want it as fresh as can be.

Time does the rest. After 24 hours, the fish will have shed moisture and darkened to a burnt terracotta hue. Eight more hours of air-drying in the fridge, and it’s ready to be sliced.

Though this salmon is prepared similarly to a classic Swedish gravadlax, I made a few tweaks to the recipe to make it especially summery. Pineapple plays very well with basil, so I used it in place of the more traditional dill. To add a bit of tropicality, I used lemon and orange zest, as well as lime and pomelo. Served atop malty rye bread and with a swipe of tangy crème fraîche, it’s the perfect meal for breakfast, lunch, or dinner.

Summery Cured Salmon
Serves 4-6

For the salmon:
140g Diamond Crystal kosher salt
100g light brown sugar
1 tsp red peppercorns
1 tsp coriander seeds
Zest of 1 lime
Zest of 1 honey pomelo
Zest of 1 lemon
Zest of 1 orange
1 large bunch basil, roughly chopped
500g boneless, skin-on salmon fillet, sushi-grade

To serve:
Rye bread
Crème fraîche
Freshly grated black pepper
Zest of 1 lemon

Line a small-to- medium baking tray with foil. In a medium-sized bowl, mix the first four ingredients together, whisking to combine. In a small bowl, add the zests of the four citrus fruits (I recommend using a Microplane grater, to ensure you don’t take off any bitter pith when zesting).

Place half of the salt and sugar mix into the foil-lined baking sheet, patting until it's just slightly larger than the piece of salmon. Place 1/3 of the basil under where the salmon will lie.

Put the salmon skin-side down on the salt mix, and then sprinkle over the zest and remaining basil. Cover the fillet with the remaining half of the salt and sugar mix, or until the fish is fully covered. Add a second piece of foil on top and crimp the two pieces together so they're tightly sealed around the fish. Place in the refrigerator and cover the salmon with heavy objects to help press out any excess moisture (I used several beer bottles).

Leave the salmon to cure for a full 24 hours. After 24 hours, remove it from the parcel and dispose of the curing mixture. Rinse any excess mixture off the salmon and pat to dry.

Fit a rack over a baking sheet, and place the salmon on top of the rack and into the fridge. Leave to chill and air-dry for eight more hours. When finished, place the salmon in a sealed container and refrigerate. It should keep for 3-4 days.

To serve, toast your slices of rye bread and top each with a generous swipe of crème fraîche. Using a very sharp knife, first remove the skin from the salmon and then slice very thin slices on a bias. Top each slice of crème fraîche-covered toast with a generous heap of cured salmon slices. Finish off with a sprinkle of freshly ground black pepper and some lemon zest.

Claire M. Bullen is a professional food and travel writer, a beerhound and all-around lover of tasty things. When she's not cracking open a cold one, she's probably cooking up roasted lamb with hummus. Or chicken laksa. Or pumpkin bread. You can follow her at @clairembullen. Pick up a can of Marble LanGOSEtine in store or at our online shop

Fundamentals #8: Marble/Hop Burns & Black Murk du Soleil Double IPA

The current trend for brewers to produce hazy IPA, often called New England IPA after its origin point, has had me thinking about haze as a fundamental component of specific beer styles.

German hefeweizen, which literally translates to English as “yeast-wheat”, is an obvious example. In this style the German yeast produces phenolic flavours of banana and clove, which are an intentional component of the beer, hence it is often left hazy to maximize these flavours.

Another beer that sprang to mind was Cooper’s Pale Ale, an Australian beer that was very popular in London seven or eight years ago. If you order a bottle of this beer, then more often than note the person serving you will gently roll the beer along the bar top to wake up the sediment in the bottom of the beer. This will also give it a hazy appearance when served.

Yet IPA has always been clear, or at least that’s what much of beer’s recent history tells to think. Craft beer has always been about finding a point of difference though, especially in a market with so many breweries. As such its not difficult to work out why exactly the hazy IPA craze sprang into being.

Manchester’s Marble, however - in particular its head brewer James Kemp - has always been vociferously supportive of clear or “bright” beer (and personally, so am I), but enter Hop Burns & Black and their new collaboration Murk du Soleil

Murk du Soleil is, as far as we know, Marble’s first intentionally hazy IPA – and a number of factors contribute towards that haze. Plenty of oats and wheat were added to the grist along with malted barley to add protein, which should give the beer a luxuriously thick body as well as aiding the suspension of particulate in the beer. According to Kemp this should also aid the perception of “juiciness” within the finished beer. No kettle finings were added during the boil either – usually a substance called Protofloc, made from seaweed, is added to pull particulate out of the beer during this stage of the brewing process.

Nelson Sauvin and Motueka hops from New Zealand – with HB&B’s Kiwi heritage, what were you expecting? - were added at the end of the boil. The same two hops were used in the dry hop at a ratio of 16 grams per litre, added over four different periods. If you were being technical you could call that a quadruple dry hop (and if you were being intentionally trendy you could print QDH on the can…).

The end result? A typically aroma-heavy example of the New England IPA style, with punchy notes of passion fruit, mango and melon dominating the nose. The texture is thick and pulpy and the finish is a little sweet and not too bitter.

Marble advises you to pour this beer carefully to avoid adding too much sediment to the beer. However, a true murk aficionado might appreciate giving the can a gentle roll on its side, Coopers-style, before pouring. The decision is all yours.

The fundamentals of beer are anything that makes up the sum of a beer’s parts. Water, barley, wheat, oats, sugars, yeast, bacteria and even adjuncts such as fruit or maize are all fundamental parts of what make up our favourite beers. You can find more from beer writer Matthew Curtis at his excellent beer blog Total AlesGood Beer Hunting and on Twitter @totalcurtis. Pick up a can of our amazing collab with Marble in store or online while stocks last.

HB&B Sub Club - our May and June boxes revealed

We're on to it as usual... Forgot to post May's amazing All Killer No FIller line-up so here it is in all its glory (and one error where the designer forgot to swap out the descriptors) - Marble's Lost Your Marbles Forest Fruit is definitely not Bold - Roasty - Hoppy), along with June's equally awesome line-up. That too has an error - we missed the Cloudwater IIPA of the list which topped off the box in fine style. Sheeeesh.

We'll be more onto it this month, we promise. And we can also promise that this month's box is nothing short of SHOCK AND AWE. Sign up here - you can opt for a monthly rolling sub or save by signing up for a 3, 6 or 12-month period. You won't regret it.

May

June

Fundamentals #3 – Marble Brewery Lost Your Marbles Red Wine B.A. Forest Fruits Imperial Stout

It really feels like Manchester’s Marble Brewery has reasserted itself as one of the nation's most relevant breweries over the past few months. Not that there should ever have been any doubt.

Under the watchful eye of head brewer James Kemp and his team, Marble has refined its core range, introduced a breathtaking new range of hop forward beers under its “Metal Series” label and released a series of complex and accomplished barrel aged beers. There was a small blip when they decided to discontinue the transcendent Dobber, one of the most important beers in my personal drinking history, but that’s OK because I’m heading to Manchester to brew it with Marble as part of its 20th anniversary celebrations later this year.

Lost Your Marbles has been released as two iterations – one barrel aged with Brettanomyces and this one, which has been aged in Pinot Noir barrels along with an addition of cherries, blackberries, blackcurrants, raspberries and redcurrants. It’s a collaboration between returning Marble brewer Joe Ince (who until recently was brewing at Magic Rock) and Dan Whitehead de Bechevel, who has recently left Marble to start his own brewery: the imaginatively named Dan’s Brewery.”

The fundamental that fascinates me in this particular beer is not the fruit but the barrels itself. None other than winemaker Andrew Nielsen of Le Grappin sourced the French Pinot Noir barrels that this beer was aged in. You might not have heard Nielsen’s name before but it's one you should learn because he has provided several other breweries, including Redchurch, Wild Beer Co and Burning Sky with wine barrels of their own. [ED: As well as making awesome wine of his own!]

I contacted Marble’s Joe Ince to ask why he selected these barrels in particular for ageing this beer. “I wanted the barrels to help mellow the stock beer, allow for longer term ageing without adding too much tannin, something I'm very wary of with wood,” he says. “I was also hoping they would add a little funk and help the fruit really come through, which I think they did. Although not a wine drinker I quite like Pinot Noir as it always presents with cherry and raspberry to me.”

The resulting beer is velveteen in texture, with a lusciously smooth carbonation. Ince has certainly achieved the low tannin and high fruit flavour content he desired. The rich chocolate malts are met by the tartness of black cherries and raspberries, producing a flavour not unlike black forest gateau, which also happens to have been the brewers' end goal with this beer.

It definitely benefits from being allowed to warm in the glass a little first and I reckon that a few months longer in the bottle wouldn’t do it any harm either – especially if you want those funky, tart flavours to come to the fore. Don’t hang about though - only 1200 bottles have been produced and based on this tasting they won’t be about for long.

The fundamentals of beer are anything that makes up the sum of a beer’s parts. Water, barley, wheat, oats, sugars, yeast, bacteria and even adjuncts such as fruit or maize are all fundamental parts of what make up our favourite beers. You can find more from beer writer Matthew Curtis at his excellent beer blog Total AlesGood Beer Hunting and on Twitter @totalcurtis. And pick up a bottle of Marble's exceptional Lost Your Marbles Red Wine BA Forest Fruits in store or online now.

#HBBAdvent Beer 24: Marble Built To Fall APA (Manchester)

Marble says: Built to Fall sings with ripe white flesh nectarines, floral-tropical notes and a hint of tangelo. Lovely resinous pine sap and ripe seville oranges lead out to to a thirst quenching and super zesty grapefruit finish.

We say: Marble just doesn't stop wowing us this year. Whether it was the Portent of Usher Imperial Stout that head brewer JK thrust into my hand as soon as I went through the doors at IndyMan, the world's best black IPA, Black Sunshine, or the oh-so-elegant Sister Agnes morello cherry-aged old ale we enjoyed the other night, every beer is a knockout. This beer seemed like the perfect fit for the night before Christmas gluttony - a perfectly executed American pale ale. Nice one JK and team - without giving away my Golden Pints pick (cough, spoiler), you're my brewery of the year. - Jen

Each night, we'll reveal the day's hand-picked beer from our Big Beery Advent Calendar. Feel free to comment below or have your say on Twitter or Instagram (#HBBAdvent). Pick up Marble Built To Fall in store or via our online shop.

New stuff in store: 17 December

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So much incredible new goodness in store this week for Christmas that we've got no time to write it all up outside of a bullet-point list. Feast your eyes on the below, then come on in and treat your taste buds. (PS: make sure you take home the above can-tastic Star Wars trilogy if you're a fan.. Moor-sporting staff member not included with purchase.)

  • Brixton Megawatt Double IPA
  • Buxton Rain Shadow Russian Imperial Stout
  • Cloudwater Brown Ale
  • Moor TFA (Totally F***ing Awesome) Black IPA
  • Mikkeller Milk Stout and Nuclear Hop Assault Imperial IPA
  • Boon Oude Geuze Bone Dry Mikkeller Selection
  • Mad Hatter Brew Co Tzatziki Sour and Blueberry Pancake & Maple Syrup
  • Marble Chocolate
  • Vocation Divide & Conquer Black IPA
  • Summer Wine Sucker Punch Pale Ale
  • Plus the awesome new craft beer card game Hip Hops!
  • AND Beavertown's brand new Invasion of the Lupuloids IPA Series: Declaration 1 and 2 on flagonfill!

New stuff in store, 3 December

It's December, so it's officially approved to use the C-word. It's OK to mention Christmas too. Here's what's new and coming at you this week.

FESTIVE BEERS:

Joining Brewdog Hoppy Christmas IPA, Weird Beard Black Christmas Cranberry Stout, Struisse Tjeeses Reserva 2013 and Mikkeller Hoppy Lovin' Xmas in the festive line-up, we have:

  • Camden Beer 2015 - a malty bock lager aged in bourbon, tequila, rum and cognac barrels. Festivity in a bottle.
  • Mikkeller Santa's Little Helper - a Belgian strong dark ale aged in tequila barrels. That's the Christmas spirit!
  • Mikkeller Fra Til Via - a porter with Christmas spices. Handily includes a gift tag on the label for gift giving made easy.
  • Mikkeller Nelson Sauvignon. A 750ml sharer that's been fermented with champagne yeast, brettanomyces and enzymes, then aged in Chardonnay white wine casks. One to pop for the New Year's celebrations? Regardless, you need this in your life. 
  • Pressure Drop India Rubber Ball - the juicy banger to end all juicy bangers, crammed full of Citra hops and clementines. We are ridiculously in love with this beer and we're not afraid to shout it from the rooftops.

Also:

  • Two new beers from the glorious Buxton Brewery that we're beyond excited about. Trolltunga Gooseberry Sour IPA is everything you want from an autumnal sour - delightfully tart - and The Living End Imperial Stout is probably the best bourbon-aged stout you'll drink all year.
  • Two new big 750ml sharers from Wild Beer. The Blend Winter 2015 Beyond Modus II is a limited edition special release based around their flagship Modus Operandi sour, blended with other barrel-aged beers from their library. Try it against the Summer Blend for an study in compare and contrast. Squashed Grapes is the beer that had Glenn blathering on for days after trying (and loving) it at Taste of London. It pretty much does what it says on the tin - it's like red and white grapes got funky. Exquisite.
  • Two new darks from our South Eastern friends Fourpure and Orbit - Fourpure's Morning Star Vanilla Porter is a luxurious chocolate number fermented with French oak chips and matured with whole Madagascan Vanilla beans. And Orbit's Seven Double Stout makes its return for 2015 - we'll be launching it at the shop on Friday, where you'll be able to try it against last year's Seven which we cunningly aged for the past year because we loved it so much.
  • And finally some returns. Magic Rock cans! Cannonball, High Wire Grapefruit, Salty Kiss - come get some. And the always popular Marble Manchester Bitter is back. Happy days.

New stuff in store: 10 September

All of this week's beer deliveries are now in and new hot sauces are on their way... We'll save the sauces for a separate post - here's what's new and exciting in the HB&B world of beer:

  • Howling Hops! It's always exciting when we introduce a new brewery to our London shelves but we've been especially looking forward to stocking East London's Howling Hops Brewery. In lieu of making it to their amazing tank bar, take home their bottled range. We've picked four varieties to start with and by jove, they're good - the clean and crisp Pale XX, the delightfully light and fragrant Running Beer American brown ale, the bold, flavour-packed IPA and their tasty dark Black XX. Collect the set.
  • A slew of new Brew By Numbers goodies, including their White IPA Citra & Mosaic in bottle and on flagon-fill and a new porter, Bramling Cross. Yes, it's officially porter season, people.
  • On the US front, we welcome back Alesmith X and IPA. We've also got a new addition from The Bruery. Regular readers of our Twitter feed will have observed the occasional ode to Rueuze, The Bruery's superlative sour. Joining it on the Big Beers shelves is Cuivre, The Bruery's one-off 7th anniversary Old Ale. We won't lie, it's the most expensive beer in the shop. That's why we've only got six of them. Splash the cash and make one yours.
  • And as always we've got a stunning line-up on flagon-fill. The Kernel brings together the big Cs for their IPA Citra Columbus Chinook Centennial, there's a great collab session pale, North by South East, from Manchester's Marble Brewery and our new South London neighbours Bullfinch Brewery, and Gipsy Hill's Yuzu returns, tasting better than ever, to name just a few.

Celebrating the chocolate beers...

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With Easter (and our beer and chocolate pairing event) on the horizon, our thoughts have turned to chocolate. More specifically, chocolate beers.

We'll be revealing the amazing beers we've paired with the creations of chocolatier Isabelle Alaya from Melange Chocolate Shop after Wednesday's event. In the meantime, here are some of the more overtly chocolatey numbers currently gracing our shelves. NB: most of these are BIG beers. Handle with care,

Siren Bones of a Sailor III Imperial Porter (UK) 9.5% - A limited edition imperial porter with cacao, vanilla and raspberries aged in Pedro Ximenez barrels. Not sure there's much more we can add to this - it tastes as remarkable as it sounds.

Wild Beer Millionaire Salted Caramel & Chocolate Milk Stout (UK) 4.7% - When this beer first arrived in store a couple of months back we dropped everything, ripped open the case and downed a bottle at 10am. Shameful, yes, but we weren't disappointed. A beautifully balanced milk stout with a long chocolate finish (and by no means over-sweet), we could drink this all day. But we won't. We've got work to do.

Chocolate Marble (UK) 5.5% - This Manchester beer flies out the door when we're lucky enough to have it in (which we do right now, thanks to a tasty new shipment). Deeply chocolatey without being heavy, it features coffee and liquorice notes, and is sublimely drinkable.

Stone Stochasticity Project Master Of Disguise Imperial Golden Stout (US) 9.7% - The culmination of an April Fool's joke, the marketing materials for this beer read "Brewed with coffee beans, cocoa and coffee beans (not a typo)." This is a golden ale made with sheets of pure cocoa and one heck of a lot of coffee that drinks like a stout. (Or a frappé if you shut your eyes.)

De Molen Heaven & Hell Imperial Stout (Netherlands) 12% - A monster of an imperial stout full of chocolate, caramel, roasted, brown and pils malts and topped off with bitter hops, this is suitably big on roasty chocolate and molasses with woody vanilla and floral notes. No one does dark beers quite like De Molen. This one is so good it's sinful.

Brooklyn Black Chocolate Stout (US) 10% - Quite simply, chocolate in a bottle. A blend of six malts and many months of ageing gives this imperial stout its massively rich chocolate aroma and flavour. 

Harbour Chocolate & Vanilla Imperial Stout (UK) 8.7% - We first tried this at Craft Beer Rising, fell in love and sought it out in bottle. A Ronseal beer, this absolutely does what it says on the tin, rammed so full of cacao nibs and vanilla pods you'll never need to buy pudding again.