Brick Brewery

The Beer Lover’s Table: Shredded Cuban-Style Pork Shoulder And Brick Brewery X 1251 Jerk Stout

Most beers aren’t explicitly created with food in mind, but this Jerk Stout — a collaboration between Brick Brewery and Chef James Cochran’s new restaurant, 1251 — is an exception.

Designed to pair with 1251’s famed jerk-spiced fried chicken, the beer was brewed with Cochran’s secret spice mix (plus malt that Cochran hand-smoked himself over applewood chips). The result is richly sweet, dark as engine oil, whiffy with smoke, and laced with a chilli heat that accumulates at the back of the throat.

While it was indeed excellent alongside the fried chicken, I wanted to explore further pairing possibilities. Serendipitously, I recently found myself flipping through Melissa Clark’s 2017 cookbook, Dinner in an Instant, and spotted a recipe for Cuban-style pork that looked like an ideal candidate. Clark’s recipe was designed for an electric pressure cooker — I’ve recently joined the legions of Instant Pot evangelicals; seriously, it’s a life-changing piece of gadgetry — but you could just as easily leave the pork simmering in a slow cooker during the day.

Marinated in grapefruit and lime juice, seasoned with fresh oregano and copious amounts of garlic, the pork stews until it falls to pieces. Once shredded, it cooks down further in its juices. The result is pork at its most decadent, ideal scooped into tortillas or served atop rice.

As I hoped, it’s also exceptional alongside the Jerk Stout, and manages to draw out the beer’s roasty character, sweetness, and smokiness. When the weather is frightful, when you only want to hunker down and hide away, this is the kind of meal you could happily hibernate with.

Shredded Cuban-Style Pork Shoulder
Adapted from Melissa Clark
Serves 6

For the pork shoulder:
8 garlic cloves, peeled
Juice of 1 ruby grapefruit
Zest and juice of 1 lime
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons light brown sugar
1 tablespoon fresh oregano leaves
3 teaspoons ground cumin
2 tablespoons kosher or fine sea salt
1 2-kilo (4.4-pound) boneless pork shoulder
2 fresh bay leaves
2-3 tablespoons vegetable oil

To serve
Large handful coriander
2-3 limes
Rice or tortillas

1. Roughly one hour before you plan to cook the pork shoulder, make the marinade. Add the garlic, grapefruit juice, lime zest and juice, olive oil, brown sugar, oregano, cumin and salt to a food processor, and blend on high until uniform.

2. Using a very sharp knife, remove the rind from the pork, if attached, and save to make chicharrones (or discard). Cut the pork shoulder into four pieces. Add to a large bowl and top with the marinade. Cover and chill for one hour.

3. After one hour, remove the pork from the fridge. Add the vegetable oil to a large frying pan, and place over high heat. Once hot, remove two pork pieces from the marinade, and allow any excess to drip off. Add to the frying pan and brown on all sides before transferring to your pressure cooker or slow cooker. Repeat with the remaining two pork pieces; do not discard the marinade. (Note that, if you are using an Instant Pot, you can also brown your pork in the pressure cooker on Sauté mode.)

4. Add the reserved marinade to your pork pieces, as well as the two bay leaves. If using a pressure cooker, seal and cook on high pressure for 80 minutes; afterwards, allow the cooker to depressurise naturally. If using a slow cooker, cook on low heat for roughly 7 hours, stopping to flip the pork pieces halfway through, or until the pork can be easily shredded.

5. When cooking is done, transfer the pork pieces to a cutting board. Using two forks, shred the meat, and discard any gristly or fatty bits, as well as the bay leaves. If using a pressure cooker, return the shredded pork to the cooking liquid. Cook on Sauté mode for approximately 15 minutes, stirring frequently, or until the excess liquid has mostly evaporated. If using a slow cooker, return the shredded pork to the cooking liquid and cook on low for 1 hour more. If there is still excess liquid after cooking, strain off and discard.

6. Season the shredded pork to taste. Serve alongside rice or tortillas, plus coriander and lime wedges.

Claire M. Bullen is a professional food and travel writer, a beerhound and an all-around lover of tasty things. Our first book with Claire, The Beer Lover’s Table: Seasonal Recipes and Modern Beer Pairings, is published by Dog’n’Bone Books in March 2019. Follow her on Twitter at @clairembullen.

Fundamentals #22 – Brick Brewery Kerala Stout

I love a good curry. The way the blend of spices mingle with the char of meat cooked in a Tandoori oven makes it one of my all time favourite dishes. These same ingredients in a beer? Not so much. At least that’s what I thought until I tried Kerala Stout, from Peckham’s Brick Brewery.

Brick has always been one of those London breweries that has so often flown under my radar. This might be something to do with me being a staunch North Londoner, seldom coming out of my quiet slice of urban suburbia, especially to venture south of the river (except to see my good pals at Hop Burns & Black of course). More’s the pity though, as South London has so much to offer. Not least pubs like Stormbird, The Old Nun’s Head and not forgetting Brick Brewery’s own taproom under the arches at Peckham Rye station. As a beer enthusiast you deserve giving yourself a chance to break habit once in a while, so do yourself a favour and head south once in a while.

Back to Kerala Stout then, which infuses a typically dry, dark and roasted stout with a mélange of spices and flavourings. These include cumin, cardamom, curry leaves, chillies and cinnamon. That level of spicing may sound a little overwhelming – but just like in a great curry the brewers at Brick have found a way to get these spices working together in harmony.

These flavours were a little muted when I first sipped at the beer, having just pulled the can from the fridge. Once the beer had been given a few minutes in the glass to warm, however, it really opened up. Notes of cumin and cardamom come to the fore, mingling with the cinnamon and sweetness from the darker malts to find balance, even adding a touch of what tastes like toasted coconut to the palate. At the finish is a gloriously satisfying touch of chilli burn – just the right amount so as not to overwhelm the beer.

This beer is great on its own but perhaps unsurprisingly, it really comes alive when paired with a similarly spiced dish. This is definitely a beer worth heading to South London for – don’t forget to pick up a curry while you’re there.

You can find more from beer writer Matthew Curtis as UK editor of Good Beer Hunting and on Twitter @totalcurtis. Pick up some Brick Kerala Stout while you still can in store or online.

Our December All Killer No Filler box revealed

We've still got a couple of All Killer No Filler beer subscription boxes left for you to pick up before Christmas (or get it delivered in time for NYE). If you've been wavering, check out what's in this month's box to get you excited (SPOILER ALERT). What a way to end the year!

 

 

The Beer Lover’s Table: Dark Chocolate Blueberry Truffles & Brick Brewery x Hop Burns & Black Black Blueberry & Vanilla Stout

As I write this, it's lightly snowing. For the first time in nearly five years, London has softened, stilled. There are many productive ways to spend such a rare, wintry Sunday; for my money, preparing chocolate truffles has to be one of the best.

Making ganache - the truffles’ base - is a sensory thing, almost overwhelmingly so. It’s good to do when everything else is cold and quiet, and the process can hold all of your focus - not because it’s especially difficult, but because it is enormously pleasurable.

You snap shards of chocolate and then watch them collapse into velvet darkness. Every spatula swirl sends up perfume. You mix the melted chocolate with warm cream and let the mixture gloss and chill until it's firm enough to work with (maybe you even squidge the bowl directly into a bit of slushy snow outside so it sets more quickly). Then you scoop out teaspoons of the set ganache and roll it into spheres, quickly, between your warming palms. To finish, you can dust your proto-truffles with cocoa powder, or dip them into a bath of melted chocolate to coat - or you can use both methods, as I did.

These truffles were inspired by Black: one of three fantastic collaboration beers made in honour of Hop Burns & Black’s third birthday. This one, brewed with Peckham's Brick Brewery, is a beautiful, inky stout. Additions of blueberry, vanilla, and lactose have all added to its dessert-like profile, though its roasty, bitter finish makes it moreish rather than cloying. To match it, the truffles are infused with blueberry jam, a dash of cinnamon and vanilla.

This recipe makes enough truffles so that you might make gifts of them and still have a plate left to yourself. I’d recommend ferrying it to the cosiest corner of your flat, cracking open a fresh can of Black and watching the snow come down.

Dark Chocolate Blueberry Truffles, Two Ways
Makes approximately 25 truffles

For the ganache:
150g blueberry jam (I used Bonne Maman Wild Blueberry Conserve)
1 tsp ground cinnamon
250g high-quality 70% dark chocolate (I used Lindt)
250ml double cream
50g light brown sugar
1 tsp vanilla bean paste

For the truffles:
150g high-quality 70% dark chocolate
50g cocoa powder
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon

First, place the blueberry jam in a small saucepan. Heat over medium-low heat until it is warm and mostly liquid. Add the cinnamon and stir well to combine. Remove from heat and let cool for 30 seconds; blend, using an immersion blender or a regular blender, to break down any whole berries in the jam. Set aside.

In a saucepan, add the double cream and the light brown sugar and warm over medium-high heat. Stir well to combine and bring the mixture to a gentle boil. Boil for approximately one minute, stirring frequently so it doesn't scorch on the bottom. Remove from heat and let stand for one minute. Add the vanilla bean paste and stir to combine.

In a large, heatproof bowl, break up the dark chocolate into small pieces. Pour over the double cream and the liquefied blueberry jam (note: you may need to return the jam to the stove on low heat for a minute so that it's pourable, as it will quickly solidify). Stir well until the chocolate is all melted. Whisk to remove any lumps. Cover and chill for at least two hours, or until the ganache has set.

Once the ganache is firm enough to work with, start to roll your truffles. With a teaspoon, scoop out a small amount of ganache and delicately and quickly roll between your palms until it forms an even sphere. Place on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and repeat. You'll want to do this as quickly as possible so the ganache doesn't soften too much; it may start melting in your hands, in which case you should pause to wash and dry them well. 

Once the ganache balls have all been rolled, cover loosely with cling-film and chill again
for another 30 minutes to help set.

Now, you’re ready to finish preparing your truffles. To make the truffles that are coated in a dark chocolate shell, you'll need a thermometer to ensure the melted chocolate is properly tempered (otherwise, it will turn blotchy or chalky as it cools). First, prepare a double boiler: heat a saucepan of water until simmering and place a second bowl on top of the pan (it should fit neatly, so there are no gaps, but its bottom should not touch the water). 

Add two-thirds of your chocolate and stir constantly until it's completely melted. Remove the bowl from the pot of water. Add the rest of the chocolate and stir until melted. Check the melted chocolate from time to time with a thermometer; you want to let it cool until it reaches 31-32 degrees C (88-90 degrees F)—mine took approximately 10 minutes to drop to the right temperature. Once it is at temperature, add one ganache ball and toss quickly with a fork until evenly coated in chocolate; remove to a plate lined with parchment paper. Repeat until roughly half of your truffles have been coated with chocolate (if the temperature of the melted chocolate drops too much, you may need to quickly reheat it).

Leave your truffles to set for 10-15 minutes. 

To make the truffles that are coated in cocoa powder, put the cocoa powder and cinnamon in a small bowl. With a fork, add one ganache ball at a time, tossing lightly, until evenly coated in the cocoa powder mixture. Set aside, shaking off any excess, and repeat until all have been coated. If you want to use one method over the other, simply double the quantity of the chocolate or the cocoa powder and cinnamon, respectively.

Claire M. Bullen is a professional food and travel writer, a beerhound and an all-around lover of tasty things. Follow her on Twitter at @clairembullen, and pick up a can or two of Brick x HB&B Black while you still can.

#HBBAdvent Beer 7: Brick Brewery Watermelon & Lime Sour (Peckham)

Brick says: This Florida Weisse style beer takes inspiration from the hot climate of its namesake - think palm-tree dotted linen shirts and Panama Hats. Soured in the kettle, 14kg of lime zest and juice added in the whirlpool and then conditioned on 50kg of fresh watermelon pulp. It's tropical tart and super refreshing.

We say: It's been awesome to see Brick - our friends and neighbours - grow and grow over the past few years. Now brewing from a superb new facility in Deptford (making even more room for the taproom and experimental brewhouse under the arches at Peckham Rye Station), their beers are both tasting and looking better than ever.

This tasty little treat is a reminder of summer days - the right levels of citrus and salt making it a joy to drink. It's all sold out now, but here's hoping they'll brew it again. We're looking forward to their festive sour - along with a New England Pale - that launches this weekend for their 4th birthday. Congrats guys! - Jen

Good things come in threes

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With our third birthday on the horizon at the end of next month (three! Can you believe it?), we thought we'd better do something rather special.

We got into this business not only because of our love of beer (and hot sauce, and vinyl), but because we love people who love beer. It's an unending privilege to work in the craft beer industry, which is one of the most inclusive and supportive industries we've ever known. That's why we love collaborations - hanging out with great people, making magic happen.

So we're properly stoked to announce the HB&B Hoppy Trinity - three anniversary collabs with three of our favourite breweries, Cloudwater, Fourpure and Brick Brewery.

HOP - HB&B x Cloudwater DDH NZ Pale: When it comes to the best hoppy beers in the UK, even the world, Manchester masters Cloudwater are top of our list. HOP is a double dry hopped pale ale rammed to the gunnels with the most succulent New Zealand hops in a nod to our Kiwi roots and a salute to one of our favourite breweries of all time.

BURNS - HB&B x Fourpure Mango & Habanero Red Ale: Ain't no party like a Fourpure party - we've enjoyed many good times with these Bermondsey legends and sold a stack of their terrific beers since the day we opened. For this beer, inspiration came from our chilli wall - specifically the amazing Burning Desire Burning Indulgence Mango & Habanero Hot Sauce. Stand by for a Juicy Banger with a kick.

BLACK - HB&B x Brick Brewery Blueberry & Vanilla Stout: Our Peckham neighbour Brick has always held a special place in our heart. We propped up the bar on the first day founder Ian Stewart threw open the doors to his tap room under the arches of Peckham Rye Station and have sunk many pints at the brewery since, so it was about time we made a beer together. One of our favourite dark beers of 2017 is Brick's Melange Imperial Stout - so we reckon this is going to knock your socks off.

In addition, we're also creating a new hot sauce, DESPACIO, with Peckham street food legends Slow Richie's. All three beers - plus the sauce - will be available at our third birthday party, to be held at the Brick Brewery Taproom in Blenheim Grove on Friday 24th November (come on down), as well as in-store, online and in a quality bar or bottle shop near you.

Enormous, enormous thanks to all the breweries involved - what a way to mark three awesome years. We can't wait to celebrate with you all.

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HB&B Sub Club - our July and August boxes revealed

Our All Killer No Filler HB&B Sub Club boxes just keep getting better. Check out the most recent boxes below and then get yourself over to the shop to join the club...

July

 

August

HB&B Sub Club - our May and June boxes revealed

We're on to it as usual... Forgot to post May's amazing All Killer No FIller line-up so here it is in all its glory (and one error where the designer forgot to swap out the descriptors) - Marble's Lost Your Marbles Forest Fruit is definitely not Bold - Roasty - Hoppy), along with June's equally awesome line-up. That too has an error - we missed the Cloudwater IIPA of the list which topped off the box in fine style. Sheeeesh.

We'll be more onto it this month, we promise. And we can also promise that this month's box is nothing short of SHOCK AND AWE. Sign up here - you can opt for a monthly rolling sub or save by signing up for a 3, 6 or 12-month period. You won't regret it.

May

June

Introducing the HB&B Can Station at Serious Pig

Beer in cans is great. So great, in fact, that we're opening a new shop in the heart of Peckham next month dedicated solely to the joy of the can.

The HB&B Can Station at Serious Pig is a Saturday-only beer emporium in association with our pals, the craft meat specialists at Serious Pig

Why? Our favourite breweries are now canning their beers, so we thought, why not devote an entire shop to cans? They’re easier to transport, they protect beer from one of its major enemies (light) and goddamnit, these days cans look bloody awesome. Plus you can fit a whole lot more of them in a fridge...

The HB&B Can Station is located at Serious Pig’s lovely railway arch under the tracks by Peckham Rye Station. The focus is firmly on takeaway, with a humongous variety of canned beer, but you'll also be able to stay for a drink on site along with a choice of food from Serious Pig’s award winning range.

Each week we’ll pick the very best and freshest cans from our 350+ strong craft beer selection and haul them over to the Can Station. Expect to find breweries such as Beavertown, Cloudwater, Magic Rock, Northern Monk, Verdant, Mikkeller, Evil Twin, Lervig, To Ol, Yeastie Boys and many more. If it’s good and in a can, it’s there.

The HB&B Can Station at Serious Pig launches Saturday 10 June and will be open from 12-6pm each Saturday over the summer at Arch 221, 42 Blenheim Grove, Peckham Rye, London SE15 4QL. See you there.

Big Beery Advent Calendar - Beer 13: Brick Brewery Red Brick Rye, 5% (Peckham)

Each night, we'll post a blog about the day's hand-picked beer in our Big Beery Advent Calendar - why we love the brewery, why we've chosen the beer, why we think you'll love it too. Feel free to comment below or have your say on Twitter.

Brick says: "Red Brick Rye is an amber ale made with rye malt and North Amer­i­can hops."

We say: Timely that this beer appears in the advent calendar on the weekend Brick celebrates its second birthday. Not only is Brick the closest brewery to our shop, head brewer Ian is also our SE15 neighbour - we live a few doors down and have loved seeing his plans come to fruition over the past two years. From its humble beginnings, Brick now boasts a heaving tap room in addition to the brewery and is an essential stop on any self-respecting Peckham food and drink tour. The Red Brick Rye is one of our favourites from the Brick range (we also love the new Peckham Coal Line Porter) and we're looking forward to raising a glass of it tonight to toast Ian for his excellent endeavours. Cheers sir!

New stuff in store - 24 September

  • Jen had a fantastic day at Beavertown Brewery for Rainbow Day last weekend - seven UK breweries collaborating with seven US breweries to create some incredible brews. We've been lucky enough to get our hands on three of the Rainbow beers this week - Siren & Surly Brewing's Blue Sky Blue Sea seaweed & cloudberry gose, Partizan & Prairie's Real Time Saison and - arriving Friday - the beer that won the day for Jen, Hawkshead & Crooked Stave's stunning Key Lime Tau. Be really, really quick to get your hands on these beers (three-beer selection packs available from Friday). They won't last long.
  • We've also brought in a bunch of Omnipollo beers which were the hit of the recent London Craft Beer Festival. HOW good do these sound - Noa Pecan Mud Pie Imperial Stout, Bianca Mango Lassi Gose and Smoothie 411 IPA brewed with wild strawberries. rhubarb, vanilla and lactose?! Best believe they taste as good as they sound.
  • Hail to two new local heroes on the pale/session front - Brick Brewery's Peckham Pale Ale and Gipsy Hill's Hepcat Session IPA. Hepcat has been going gangbusters in both bottle and on flagon-fill so you'll be pleased to hear we've stocked up on another keg to keep you going over the next few days. The Brick pale has just turned up while writing this - looking fly in jaunty orange...
  • From Bermondsey way, Kernel's London Brick Red Rye Ale was so popular on flagon-fill last week that we've brought in 330ml bottles. You're going to love this beer.
  • Oh yeah, and Gunnamatta's back!

HBB1 - our first hot sauce

Today we launch these bad boys!

That's right, in celebration of our six-month anniversary (any excuse for a knees-up), we introduce HBB1 - Hopped & Burning Hot Sauce.

HBB1* is the first in an ongoing series of hot sauces that are the result of collaborations between Team HB&B and our favourite chilli producers and breweries.

We created HBB1 with UK hot sauce queen Miranda Pellew of Chilli Pepper Pete in Brighton and our friends at Peckham’s own Brick Brewery. It's based on the popular Middle Eastern sauce zhoug and brings together coriander, parsley, cumin and lemon juice with jalapeno and Thai chillies, plus an infusion of Summit hops.

Zhoug sauces are huge in the Middle East and for good reason - they're delicious. Super-zesty with a kick, zhoug can be used on pretty much anything. Our hopped version is naturally well suited to Middle Eastern dishes, is nothing short of amazing with all things BBQ and - as you'd expect - goes extremely well with a beer.

It's in store from now at the bargain price of £4.95. Come get some!

* Yes, that catalogue number may just be a reference to Factory Records.